One of my favorite online resources is Paul Graham’s blog, with his incredible list of thought-provoking essays. I like his idea of “condensing forty years into four,” as it also (kind of) applies to high risk investing – it helps me keep my sanity in the current cryptocurrency markets. 

How to make Wealth

“Economically, you can think of a startup as a way to compress your whole working life into a few years. Instead of working at a low intensity for forty years, you work as hard as you possibly can for four. This pays especially well in technology, where you earn a premium for working fast.”

“Startups are not magic. They don’t change the laws of wealth creation. They just represent a point at the far end of the curve. There is a conservation law at work here: if you want to make a million dollars, you have to endure a million dollars’ worth of pain. For example, one way to make a million dollars would be to work for the Post Office your whole life, and save every penny of your salary. Imagine the stress of working for the Post Office for fifty years. In a startup you compress all this stress into three or four years. You do tend to get a certain bulk discount if you buy the economy-size pain, but you can’t evade the fundamental conservation law. If starting a startup were easy, everyone would do it.”

“A startup is like a mosquito. A bear can absorb a hit and a crab is armored against one, but a mosquito is designed for one thing: to score. No energy is wasted on defense. The defense of mosquitos, as a species, is that there are a lot of them, but this is little consolation to the individual mosquito.”

paulgraham.com/wealth.html

Related reading includes Morgan Housel’s The Psychology of Money,  and Naval Ravikant’s How to Get Rich (without getting lucky)  tweetstorm.